News

20 February 2014

Hypnosis Therapy Shown to Decrease Fatigue Levels In Breast Cancer Patients
Researchers at Mount Sinai find cognitive behavioral therapy plus hypnosis (CBTH) reduces fatigue in radiotherapy breast cancer patients
http://icahn.mssm.edu/about-us/news-and-events/hypnosis-therapy-shown-to-decrease-fatigue-levels-in-breast-cancer-patients

 

10 Sept 2013:
Trial comparing hypnotherapy versus gabapentin
After 8 weeks, the median number of daily hot flashes (hot flushes) was reduced by 33.3% in the gabapentin arm and by 80% in the hypnotherapy arm.
Randomised controlled trial comparing hypnotherapy versus gabapentin for the treatment of hot flashes in breast cancer survivors: a pilot study.
Maclaughlan David S, Salzillo S, Bowe P, Scuncio S, Malit B, Raker C, Gass JS, Granai CO, Dizon DS.
Source
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford Women’s Cancer Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24022390

 

 

 

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Hypnotherapy for Incontinence, Trial:  The University of New Mexico, USA

12 April 2013

Brain-Centered Therapy Versus Medication for Urgency Urinary Incontinence : Hypnotherapy Or Pharmacotherapy (Hyp-hOP)

Purpose

This study includes:

  1. A trial in which urge incontinent women (N=152) will be randomized to hypnotherapy or pharmacotherapy and evaluated at months 2, 6 &12.
    • The primary objective will be change in Urgency Urinary Incontinence (UUI) episodes.

    Continue reading here:    http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01829425

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The National Council for Hypnotherapy Announces New Research Director

(PRWEB UK) 8 March 2013

The National Council for Hypnotherapy is pleased to announce a newly appointed Research Director. Revealed at this year’s Extravaganza held at The Royal Society of Medicine in London on 2nd March 2013, Dr Nick Smith is set to head up research at the National Council for Hypnotherapy.

Dr Smith initially trained as a GP in New Zealand and spent time as a flying doctor in Australia before returning to the UK and discovering a fascination with psychiatry. After re-training at the Maudsley Hospital before moving into the pharmaceutical industry, Dr Smith worked on the research for a number of widely used psychiatric medicines. During that time Dr Smith became one of the only few psychiatrists to gain an MBA and an approved cognitive hypnotherapist, training with Trevor Silvester at the Quest Institute. He is currently in the process of moving to Bath, where he intends to specialise in managing stress and blocks to creativity.

Source:  PRWeb    http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/3/prweb10511617.htm

 

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Creative minds are more susceptible to anxiety, advises The Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy

The study released today shows a marked percentage increase for anxiety amongst people that believe they are creative in some way.

 

Wallington, Surrey (PRWEB UK) 17 February 2013

The study involved 328 of their clients. 153 were clients who were having hypnotherapy for anxiety and 175 were being seen for issues unrelated to anxiety. In the study their clients were asked a set of simple questions. One of the questions was “Do you consider yourself to be a creative person, yes or no?”

The results showed that 88% of the anxiety clients believed that they were creative in some way, whereas surprisingly, only 47% of the non-anxiety clients believed they were creative.

Paul Howard, the anxiety specialist at The Surrey Institute of Clinical Hypnotherapy said, “The results were quite unexpected and lead us to believe that creative people have a higher propensity for developing anxiety conditions.”

The anxiety clients were, in the main, suffering with agoraphobic type issues like having panic attacks whilst travelling and shopping, and social phobia issues like blushing, exams, presentations and public speaking.

Creative people are often associated with creative jobs. However, interestingly in this study the mix of professions was across the board, from accountants to secretaries, with no particularly creative type professions like artist, musician or architect being prevalent.

Howard went on to say, “Although this study does not prove that creative people have a high risk of anxiety, the results are interesting and warrant further investigation. In a study we are starting soon we intend to give clients a test to establish quite how creative they are, making the results more objective.“

                                                             hypnotherapy surrey
                                                         Paul Howard hypnotherapist – anxiety specialist
The results were quite unexpected and lead us to believe that creative people have a higher propensity for developing anxiety conditions.

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27 June 2012, 6.48am EST

Mapping Australia’s collective weight gain

OBESE NATION: It’s time to admit it – Australia is becoming an obese nation. Today we launch a series looking at how this has happened and, more importantly, what we can do to stop the obesity epidemic. In Australia today, around two-thirds of adults and a quarter of children are overweight or obese…

One in four Australians are now obese. But when – and how – did we gain this weight? Kyle May

OBESE NATION: It’s time to admit it – Australia is becoming an obese nation. Today we launch a series looking at how this has happened and, more importantly, what we can do to stop the obesity epidemic.


In Australia today, around two-thirds of adults and a quarter of children are overweight or obese. This is a dramatic change from the landscape just 30 years ago when we first collected national data on weight and height.

In 1980, around 60% of Australian adults had a healthy weight; today this has almost halved to around 35%. In 1980, just 10% of adults were obese. In 2012, this figure tips 25%. The infographic below shows just how quickly obesity is increasing in Australia. And why it’s not an 1980, around 60% of Australian adults had a healthy weight; today this has almost halved to around 35%. In 1980, just 10% of adults were obese. In 2012, this figure tips 25%. The infographic below shows just how quickly obesity is increasing in Australia. And why it’s not an exaggeration to call it an epidemic.

Read the full article at:

The Conversation http://theconversation.com/au/republishing_guidelines